Magnificent May

I decided it was time to take a walk around my garden and enjoy it instead of just working in it!

Along the roadside the wild cow parsley is doing an excellent job of hiding the taty remains of the daffodils.

IMG_20200510_114644050_HDR

Outside the conservatory a pot of aquilegia is flowering

IMG_20200510_114745999

On the way up the hill to the veg patch I pass a rhododendron

IMG_20200510_114056082

At the top is a copper beech tree. As a child living on the edge of Manchester we would often go into Heaton Park where there was a huge copper beech which I loved. So we planted one here.

IMG_20200510_114105805_HDR

In the greenhouse most of the apricots I so lovingly fertilised with a brush fell off! But the peaches are hanging on so here’s hoping.

IMG_20200510_114445759

In another part of the greenhouse nasturtiums overwintered and are flowering again. I love them for their beauty but also eat the leaves and flowers in salads

IMG_20200510_114222688

In the veg beds I couldn’t bear to pull up these forget-me-nots and the peas don’t seeem to mind!

IMG_20200510_114246031

This apple tree is extra special because I grafted it myself. (The less said about the others which didn’t take the better!)

IMG_20200510_114339679

If I carry on into the woods the bluebells are flowering.

IMG_20200510_092753823

I am so lucky to have all this.

Lessons from Lockdown

When our children were babies my husband worked for a while as an Audit Assistant with the local Council. It was a small Council and Audit got various jobs that didn’t really belong to any department or took up slack when other departments were unusually busy. One day he was asked to review the insurance for all the Council vehicles before it was renewed. ‘Just think of the worst accident you can imagine and make sure we would be OK’ was the instruction from his boss. His scenario involved a bin lorry, failed brakes, a steep hill between busy shops and with the Council Offices at the bottom.

More importantly it made him think about our lives. What could go wrong? What would the consequences be? Did we have the ‘insurance’ to cope? From then on he was known for his ‘belt, braces and a bit of baler twine just in case’ approach. That seemingly trivial task at work became a foundation stone for our lives. We didn’t become fearful or paranoid, just determined to think about our resilience and try always to have plan ‘B’.

IMG_20200503_134445519
Soft fruit gives a lot of yield for little effort

We agreed that we would try to accumulate useful practical skills going as far back down the process as possible and to do so using only the most basic equipment. I knew how to sew but learned how to mend, do patchwork using recycled fabric, sew by hand as well as machine, relearned how to knit and crochet, then to spin and to dye using natural ingredients (I am not very good at either but know enough that I could become competent). John added DIY and building to his ‘O’level woodwork then did a weekend course in blacksmithing. We learned to garden and to cook with what was available rather than starting with a recipe and buying the ingredients. Foraging increased the range of foodstuffs we could use. Preserving kept summer foods for winter use. We kept poultry and pigs for meat and eggs.

The spinning wheel I have been lent and the workshop

I hope I am not giving the impression that I live (or have lived) some buccolic idyll of self sufficiency. Complete self sufficiency is a myth. It is also part of the ‘I’m all right Jack’ bunker mentality of the survivalists. I happily accept gifts from neighbours, shop from local farms and buy staples like flour and sugar from the supermarket. I enjoy eating bananas and lemons that will not grow in the UK. I heat my home predominantly with electricity and since heat is needed mainly when the sun is not shining I need the National grid to take surplus power when I have it and sell me some when I need it. I use more than I generate so I am dependent on other suppliers particularly over winter. I prefer to use hand tools but am realistic about the efficiency of powered ones. And so on.


Allowing kales to self seed looks messy but gives me an early crop for no work. Small ones for salad and big ones to cook.

The last few weeks has been the first big test of that resilience for a long time. I have coped pretty well. Not pefectly so there are things I need to think about but on the whole well enough. I am of course lucky to be retired – my income is not dependent on me being able to work. I don’t have young children to care for and school or entertain. Having a mortgage free home in the country with a large garden has been a great blessing and is partly down to luck and partly to hard work and choices. Food in the garden, hedgerows to forage in, preserves and a well stocked freezer mean I have had plenty to eat and gardening, crafting, dogs and a home to look after have given me plenty to do.


Workdays and permaculture groups have made me lots of friends

Getting to know my neighbours, building a wider community by joining in things and volunteering means I have had plenty of offers of help with things like shopping and lots of electronic contact with others. My washing machine stopped working with a smell of hot rubber and some expensive noises just after lockdown started. I could have ordered a new one online for home delivery but I suspect it can be repaired and I know a very competent man who will come and look at it – but not at the moment. My neighbour has been doing my washing each week since and has been pleased to help me since she was becoming embarassed about asking me to drive her children to clubs when she had two of them needing to go in opposite directions at the same time. Of course I have missed being able to go out and meet friends for coffee, walks on the beach, visitors coming here, workdays… but I haven’t been lonely or felt vulnerable.

So where could I do better? I didn’t have enough pet food to see me through even the original 3 week lockdown. I buy dog and cat food in sacks from the farmers co-op but in future I need to have an unopened sack of each as well as the one I am using. That means I also need to make sure there is space for them in the new utility room. I can adjust my diet to suit what is growing but it is harder to do that for the animals! I also went to the vets and got some more of the pain relief medicine Orchid needs. I was a bit over cautious there as the bottle will finally run out tomorrow but even so I need to keep a better supply in future.


C&M have closed the trust shop but between 10am and 2pm Thursday, Friday and Saturday they are open to take orders called through the window. They put everything requested together in a box which is put outside the door for the customer to pick up.

I have been going to C&M for fresh fruit and veg, butter and cheese. I decided a few years ago that potatoes, onions and carrots were not worth growing. Potatoes because I always miss some when I dig them up and get ‘volunteers’ the next year which outcompete the things I am trying to grow, onions because they came out the same size as the sets that went in and carrots because the local carrot root flies get them all. This year I have been able to get some manure to improve my veg patch and am planting lots of leeks instead of onions. I had intended growing some potatoes in pots which I could empty completely when I harvested them but missed the seed potatoes. Butter and cheese I can start keeping in the freezer. So I just need to tweak my growing and storing. On the other hand by shopping there I have been supporting a local business – a balance to be struck.


preserves have been a boon

The other thing I have needed to buy is milk. I have been thinking about that gap for a while and had a go at milking a goat at a friend’s place a while back. Going back into livestock isn’t something to do on a whim or for an unusual event but I do need to have another think.

Of course if this goes on for much longer I will run out of other things, there will be other breakages and breakdowns. My hair needs cutting and since I had it cut short I no longer have slides and clips to keep it out of my eyes. A dental appointment has been postponed. A former neighbour died and I was unable to go to the funeral – it should have been a ‘standing room only’ affair but must have been very small instead – not a fitting send-off for a very popular and respected man.

Sometime fairly soon lockdown will be eased if not lifted and I will be very glad. I will enjoy a trip into Cardigan to have a coffee, meet friends, go to the library, buy some more knitting yarn and restock at the supermarket. I will get my hair cut, my tooth filled and my washing machine repaired. But I owe a huge debt of gratitude to that imaginary bin lorry!

Blessings # 21 – U is for upcycling a.k.a. Scrap Happy April!

When I started this series I was wondering how to accomodate Scrap Happy and by a wonderful bit of serendipity todays letter is U!

When we revamped this house we installed a new bathroom in a diferent place from the old one before taking the old one out. We therefore had a lot of pieces of used plastic waste pipe lying around. Re-arranging the kitchen added more and then there were the offcuts from the new things going in. By the time we finished the pile of lengths was quite big. So John cut it all into short pieces, stood them in punnets which came from the supermarket with mushrooms in, into the bottoms of which he had pierced holes, and used them as modules for planting seeds.

Over time the chemotherapy took its toll on his digestive system. He also became immuno-compromised and had to take antibiotics for a whole sequence of infections. So he started to take those probiotic drinks to try to help his gut recover. The empties piled up until he had the idea of cutting the bottoms off and using those as modules in the same way.
IMG_20200415_121102032

They have been going now for almost 15 years and still get washed and re-used every year. Once the seedlings get going they are either transplanted into the ground or potted on into old cream or yoghurt pots (again with holes made with a drill or a soldering iron). These days I also stand the tubes and pots in plastic boxes which are the containers mushrooms are delivered to C&M Organics in. They cannot be returned or recycled but hold 60 of my modules so enough for a whole row of peas or beans.

IMG_20200415_135730912

Since so many people seem to be starting to see the wisdom of growing some of their own food now that shopping is less easy |I thought these might trigger some creatibve ways to grow on the cheap and with what is to hand.

Scrap happy is curated by Kate and Gun (links below) and celebrates creative ways in which people use scrap materials to make lovely new things.

Here are the links for everyone who joins ScrapHappy from time to time (they may not post every time, but their blogs are still worth looking at).

Kate, Gun, Titty, Heléne, Eva, Sue, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy, Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan,
Moira, Sandra, Linda, Chris, Nancy, Alys, Kerry, Claire, Jean,
Joanne, Jon, Hayley, Dawn, Gwen, Connie, Bekki, Pauline,
Sunny and Kjerstin

See you next time for more scrappy loveliness.

Blessings # 19 – S is for Sunshine

And I have been blessed with some almost every day for the last 3 weeks whilst we have been locked down.

When we were looking for a place to buy we had a wide search area but a clear list of things we wanted – a large plot so we could have a big garden and no neighbours too close, ideally a plot which was empty so we could build a house to suit ourselves, somewhere quiet with clean air. We also wanted to be well above sea-level. We both loved living on the Exe Estuary in Devon but had noticed that the boards which were put across the slipways under the railway tracks were being used more often and built higher, until we began to wonder how long it would be before our village was flooded. But top of the list for John was that the plot should be South facing.

That proved to be a problem. All the building plots were rather mean in size and on the North facing side of the valley or road. The South facing side had been built up first to the end of the area designated for development and now only plots on the north facing side would get planning permission. Had ‘One Planet Developement’ been available we might have looked at that but that came in much later. (To find out what One Planet Developement is all about read my previous post here) When we started looking at plots with buildings on we found that almost all the houses were orientated to face East. After all farm workers needed light in the morning to get up and get to work and possibly some in the evening but during the day they would be busy outdoors! This place was probably built as it was because digging out any more of the hill would have been far to much work for a pair of mere tied cottages!

Had we been able to build to our own design we would have made even better use of the sunny aspect. But we did what we could. Eleven years ago we finally had funds to have solar panels put on the roof. The big array is solar PV which generate electricity. At the time the government were offering good incentives to ramp up solar generation so I get just over 50p for each kilowatt they generate, which in Summer gives me a nice bonus and even in winter gives a little. After a few years they had paid for themselves and they will go on bringing in a tax free amount for the next 14 years. After that it will just be what I get for selling the power to the grid which is very little! But what I use is free and the system is set up so that I use my own power in preference to power from the grid if I am generating. Of course my main need for electricity is in winter but at least I can do my spring cleaning at the moment with a clear conscience. All the extra washing of curtains and covers is using free power!

It is hard to see in the photo because the elder tree was in the way but there are 2 solar thermal panels on the lower roof. They give me hot water when the sun shines so I don’t have to use the heating system so much.

IMG_20200413_121019157
The derelict shed is attached to the equally derelict cottage next door! Finding a spot where I could take a photo of the roof without too many trees in the way proved tricky now they are coming into leaf!

The lean-to greenhouse is not there because I needed more space to grow under glass. It is to absorb heat when the sun is shining and by opening the windows I can let it inside. Today there is a chilly wind but in there it is hot and the house is toasty without any heating being used.

The last improvement, a couple of years ago, was to have the deck built so that I can sit and enjoy the sun in summer.

IMG_20200413_121206773

Sun to sit and bask in, sun to heat my home and grow my food, sun to heat the water and sun to run appliances and give me a little bit of extra income – what a blessing!

Blessings # 17 – Q is for Quiet

My increasing deafness is entirely caused by my brain not processing sound properly – my ears are fine. Apparantly this problem is genetic and sadly my grand-daughter has it too and whereas mine only became a problem in middle age and only affects my hearing she has always struggled to process speech and language n written form as well.

I do sometimes wonder if the problem is made worse by the fact that I actually enjoy silence so there is little motivation for me to push my brain to ‘hear’.

That love of peace and quiet is why I try to use only hand tools. I hate the racket of power tools. This morning I was doing some gardening whilst it was still cool. The birds singing was the only sound I could hear. There is never much traffic on the road here but even less now we are all in lockdown. Add in a Bank Holiday and I have only heard 2 vehicles pass all morning.

The sounds I do want to hear are the birds singing, bees buzzing, the breeze rustling the trees, the stream burbling on its way, my cats purring, the grandfather clock ticking, the timer telling me my meal is cooked or bread baked….

From that perspective this place is perfect.

Blessings # 12 – L is for Larder

I deliberately try to grow more food in this garden than I need so I have some to give away. That is prticularly true for low work, high value stuff like soft fruit. I mean what woman can eat all the apricots 2 trees produce or the grapes from 5 vines? The grapes are a bit OTT I have to admit. I have tried making wine and it comes into the ‘drinkable if desperate or too drunk to care’ category so I have given up. Partly I grow the vines to give some shade in the greenhouses, partly because they look so lovely – the fruit is a bonus. But it is easy to give away and the birds enjoy the rest. Bushes like blackcurrants are so easy to reproduce from cuttings – again I give away loads and find spaces for any that are left which add to the bounty. I also go foraging along the lanes in autumn for blackberries and sloes.

As well as eating as much of the fruit and veg as I want and giving away some of the surplus I bottle fruit, fill the freezer, make jams, chutneys, pickles and buy citrus fruit to make marmalade. Those stocks help me through the winter and there are very few people who aren’t grateful for a gift of homemade preserves.

I also belong to a group who buy direct from Suma Wholesale. Suma is a workers co-operative which supplies wholefoods and organic groceries, mostly to shops, through a website. When John and Jean, the organisers of the group tell us that they are planning a delivery we each go online and order what we need. At the checkout we put our name as the reference. The whole lot, together with copies of the orders, is then delivered to John and Jean who spend a couple of hours sorting it into different piles in their home office ready for us to collect. I have discovered (sometimes the hard way) that not everything is worth buying in bulk – some walnuts went rancid before I could use them all up. But flour, dried fruit, tins of tomatoes and things like that last indefinitely.

A few weeks before we were all told to stay home I had to go to Carmarthen. I usually shop in Cardigan where there are more of the small independent shops I prefer but to get my hair cut or to have my NHS hearing aids serviced I have to go to Carmarthen. The supermarkets there are bigger than in Cardigan and realising that Easter would come up before I went there again I decided to stock up my freezer ready for family visiting. I expected my son to collect his son from Swansea University and he usually makes a weekend of it. Lately he has been giving Sean’s housemate, Irfan, a lift home too so that is 3 extra people to feed. I also wondered if my daughter might take the chance to come whilst her daughter was on holiday with her friend’s family.

In the event of course my son made a flying visit just before lockdown began and none of them has been able to visit since. Nor have I been going out to workdays and events so I have been baking less.

I have been so grateful for my ‘pantry’ now! I was able to help my neighbour out with some things she had run short of and she gave me eggs which she gets from a friend of hers. Since it is a dairy farm they can also give me milk when I need some.

After not going out other than to walk the dogs for 2 weeks I went to C&M on Saturday for some fresh veg and this week I will have to go to the Farmers Co-op for some dog food and cat food. Both places have instituted systems where you tell them what you need and they put your order outside for you to pick up. There is no contact between staff and customers and customers are expected to be sensible about staying well apart in the car park. But I think it will be several weeks before I need to brave a supermarket again!

Blessings # 7 – Garden

Sometimes, when I am struggling to keep up with the jobs, or I ache all over from barrowing stuff up the hill I long for a tiny courtyard garden with a few pots and some comfy chairs. Who am I kidding? I would get more and more pots until it was a very productive but rather claustrophobic jungle! I love that my garden has different areas with different characters. And just now it is brilliant to be able to get outside without breaking quarantine. I have enough assorted greens growing to keep me in salads and cooked greens without needing to shop which is a real bonus.

Blessings #2 – B is for Bees

I was chatting to Chris from C&M Organics the other day when I was showing her daughter Anna my garden. We had got to the greenhouses and were admiring my apricot trees which were in bloom and noticed a bee working the flowers. I always make sure of a good set by dabbing them with a paint brush every couple of days just in case it is too cold or wet for the bees to fly. Chris told me that she had some broad beans in flower in the polytunnel for an early crop but had seen no bees on them so her husband Matt was patiently pollenating them all by hand. If we were to lose all the pollenating insects that is what we would have to do to every fruit tree and bush, all the crops where we eat the fruit and even the other crops such as roots and leaves are grown from seeds so all those parent plants would have to be brushed too. Only things like hazel nuts which are wind pollenated would be easy to grow. Can you imagine it? Presumably someone would invent a tractor attachment to speed the process up but it would still add a lot to the work and cost of food.


Between us the bees and I seem to have done a good job!

My paternal grandfather, who lived in Llanelli on the South Wales coast, was a founder member of the Carmarthenshire Beekeepers Association and known as Dai the bees. My father taught woodwork at a school on the Northern edge of Manchester and kept several hives of bees on a piece of otherwise unused land behind the school canteen. That would never be allowed now but at the time was seen as the perfect way to eliminate one of the hidey holes for smokers and other banned behaviour! During the summer holidays he was a seasonal bee inspector going round other peoples apiaries checking them for diseases. I have happy memories of going with him as a little girl and playing in some lovely gardens whilst he did his job. He was also treasurer of the Manchester association which had meetings at members apiaries during the summer. The beekeepers, mostly men, went through the hives and one of the more experienced pointed out things of interest whilst the wives sat in deckchairs and chatted and the children played. Each family took a picnic tea and the host provided cups of tea.


Granddad on the left and Dad on the right

When we moved here John very much wanted us to have some hives but by the time that idea got to the top of our list his health was deteriorating, I knew that I would have to do the bulk of the work and having helped my Dad knew that lifting heavy hive boxes singlehandedly on hot days whilst wearing overalls, veil, gloves and boots was hard work. I also knew that all our animals conspired to create their dramas when John was also having a bad day and I never knew who to deal with first. So I refused. Instead we let it be known that any beekeeper wanting space for an apiary would be welcome to talk to us. And so Ted and SUe came into our lives. They live a few miles away and had more hives than they could accomodate in their garden.


Ted and Sue’s hives in two different parts of the garden. I have cut the bottoms out of the pots in the picture on the right so the saplings in them can root down into the rather stony soil and create a hedge.

Their hives are still here so I get all the benefits but none of the work. Ted ans Sue make sure that any bad tempered bees are re-queened promptly so they are no trouble. We asked for no rent but every autumn a box appears in my porch with a years supply of honey and a large bottle of gin! Both are delicious!

In praise of hedges

I spent Sunday at a field just outside Fishguard on the North West coast of Pembrokeshire. One of the members of the Permaculture group has just bought it with the intention of creating a small nature reserve with a wild flower meadow, lots of trees and shrubs, a couple of ponds and somewhere to sit and enjoy it all. He has had the ponds dug and is waiting to see what sets up home there. Some trees have been planted but one of our tasks was to plant more and in particular to put in a double row of saplings along the track leading to the field to grow into a hedge.

IMG_20200315_114238040

Janey, Ian and I planted the hedge

IMG_20200315_114106976

Brian and Denise stripped patches of turf off the area where the wildflower meadow will be and strewed meadow hay full of seeds on the bare ground

IMG_20200315_114001409_HDR

our base camp!

Around here most of the farmers have their hedges cut back almost to the ground every autumn using a flail on a tractor. The flail, for those of you who have never encounteed one, is a cutting head like an old fashioned push along lawn mower – a collection of sharp blades spiralling round a central axle

hedge cutting

The result is a hedge which is neither use nor ornament!

No use to keep stock in, no use for birds to nest in or small animals to hide in and producing no fruit or berries. I look at the ugly, mangled stems and feel so sorry for the plants.

Many years ago, before tractors and such like machinery became ubiquitous, farm workers spent days and days in the winter keeping the hedges in good order. It was cold, hard, skilled work and I can quite understand why they would much prefer to sit in a warm cab letting red diesel power through the job! I suspect that it will also be cheaper to do it that way.

Since I have the time and have learnt the skill I lay my hedges the old-fashioned way. My trusty billhook does most of the work. I use it to sharpen posts which I knock in with a lump hammer. The stems are then partly severed, bent down then woven round the posts. I have a bowsaw (or a pruning saw to get into small gaps) to take out any stems too big to weave in or which are surplus to requirements (some of the multi stem hazels are just too dense). Those cut stems are set aside. The thicker bottoms make posts and the brash can be woven in where the gaps between trees are too big or the trees too weedy as ‘dead hedge’ to fill the space and provide cover for the new saplings I put in to thicken the hedge up.

I don’t have livestock but the resulting boundaries are very effective at keeping my elderly lurcher, Orchid, from wandering off in pursuit of interesting smells. As the trees put out new branches and the whole tangle gets thicker, wider, denser, they will provide a safe place for small creatures and food for them too.

This winter Rob has cleared old dead willows (the remains of some planting my husband did many years ago) from a section of the top boundary, coppiced the living trees and laid the hedges north and East of the orchard. I have almost finished the one on the southern edge of the orchard, cleared the brambles under the apple trees and trained the old loganberry.

There are saplings ready to plant out between the hedge and the top fence. I have chosen species which will provide fruit or nuts for the wildlife – apples (from pips), hazel, holly and hawthorn which I have weeded out of veg beds and rowan which I have bought. Hopefully in a few years time there will be a narrow strip of productive woodland that joins the much bigger wood that I rent beyond my Western boundary and the smaller one to the East.

Even though quite a lot of the material cut out has been used to dead hedge, there are still piles of wood to go for firewood. Many a small farm produced all its fuel from the hedges.

IMG_20200318_123131229

An entirely natural and sustainable boundary, a resource for wildlife and a source of fuel – what’s not to like?!

I am looking forward to going back to Howard’s field in a few years time and helping to lay that new hedge as part of his wider plan for a small patch of biodiversity in a green desert of farmland.

2020 Whether I am ready or not – I’m not!

A number of my friends in the blogosphere have been posting about their goals for 2020. It has set me thuinking about mine.

Well I said a while back that I want to redecorate the house. I did it shortly after my husband died as we had not got round to it as a joint project. But 9 years on it is looking shabby, not helped by two dogs and three cats trailing in mess and rubbing against the walls and furniture. I got one wall in the sitting room done and a small area of the kitchen turned into a blackboard before Christmas but that was all. So finishing the job could be my first goal. As usual I only remembered to take a photo of the change after I had started!

Orchid, the lurcher, believes the sofa is entirely for her benefit. She would like to take over the comfy chair as well but I have drawn the line at that. She finds it necessary to ‘nest’ before settling down and as the sofa is old she has shredded the covers on the seat cushions. I know I have the skill and equipment to make new covers so that can be goal 2.

IMG_20200112_140808477

If I am repainting the kitchen I need to move everything off the shelves and out of the cupboards so I might as well take the opportunity to put it all back in different places and make it more efficient. And in the process I will have a clear out of stuff I no longer use and maybe buy a couple of gadgets I have had my eye on. So that would be my third goal.

I planned to finish my Diploma in Applied Permaculture Design over the Christmas and New Year break with a view to it being marked and finished by the Spring. But I sent the first 5 designs for interim assessment at the beginning of November and apart from an acknowledgement that they arrived have heard nothing since. What better excuse could I have to put off the tedious job of writing up the last 5? However I guess I should really have it as goal 4.

IMG_20200112_135914767

Outside there are all the usual jobs; cut firwood, grow veggies, keep the place reasonably tidy…. But I would like to finish clearing along the top boundary where the willow we planted 20 odd years ago for coppicing as firewood grew and then died before we got round to cutting it. I will replace it with a shelter belt of trees which produce fruit or berries, not so much as food for me as food for wildlife. Where does that bring me? Oh yes goal 5.

IMG_20200112_140106753_HDR

Ages ago I had a building put up on an existing concrete slab with the intention of moving the utility room into it. It needs to have the walls and ceiling insulated, electricity supply put in, plumbing done, shelves put up.. I am hoping a builder is coming soon but I will have to supervise, buy a new freezer and transfer all my jars of preserves and little used kitchen equipment across.At present I use the old garage for laundry and as a food store but it is too big and attracts clutter. Once it has been cleared out I could turn it into two extra bedrooms for when family stay. So that would be Goal 6.

IMG_20200112_140522901

I also have the wood for a compost loo for the veg patch.It is in the car port and in the way. Errrr Goal 7.

My daughter and her husband are divorcing so she will be moving soon. As she works full time and is doing an Open University Degree in her spare time I have offered to do any decorating and to be there to let tradesmen and deliveries in. She lives about 4 hours drive away so that will take up some time. I am up to Goal 8

IMG_20200112_140554457

There are friends I have not seen for ages. My spinning wheel and wood turning lathe gather dust. The patchwork cushion covers are falling apart and need replacing. When did I last make myself some clothes instead of buying them? I keep thinking of walking some sections of the Coast Path. I haven’t been to the theatre, cinema or a concert for too long.

Who am I kidding? It would be lovely to do any, let alone all, these things. If I am not careful the pressure to get everything done will destroy my pleasure in them.

So my goal for 2020 is to get to the end of the year well and happy having achieved some progress on some of those things and to have had a lot of fun. Oh and to celebrate my 70th birthday in style!

I hope you will keep me company on the way and share the fun with me.